7 Replies Latest reply on Apr 2, 2015 1:30 PM by Bill Robinson

    Perl NSH.pm - ...NSH.so: undefined symbol: Perl_Tstack_sp_ptr

    Christopher Blanks

      All,

       

      I am having issues using the NSH.pm environment on my new BSA installation.  Here is the current state on the new machine:

       

      # uname -a

      Linux crlnxp048 2.6.32-504.8.1.el6.x86_64 #1 SMP Fri Dec 19 12:09:25 EST 2014 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

      # which perl

      /usr/bin/perl

      # perl -version

       

      This is perl, v5.10.1 (*) built for x86_64-linux-thread-multi

       

      Copyright 1987-2009, Larry Wall

       

      Perl may be copied only under the terms of either the Artistic License or the

      GNU General Public License, which may be found in the Perl 5 source kit.

       

      Complete documentation for Perl, including FAQ lists, should be found on

      this system using "man perl" or "perldoc perl".  If you have access to the

      Internet, point your browser at http://www.perl.org/, the Perl Home Page.

      # perl

      use NSH;

      perl: symbol lookup error: /usr/lib64/perl5/auto/NSH/NSH.so: undefined symbol: Perl_Tstack_sp_ptr

       

      Quick searches would indicate that this module was compiled for an older version of perl, so is this a configuration issue or is there a newer version of NSH.pm that I should be using?  This works fine on my older installation:

      # uname -a

      Linux crlnxp008 2.6.18-400.1.1.el5 #1 SMP Sun Dec 14 06:01:17 EST 2014 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

      # which perl

      /usr/bin/perl

      # perl -version

       

      This is perl, v5.8.8 built for x86_64-linux-thread-multi

       

      Copyright 1987-2006, Larry Wall

       

      Perl may be copied only under the terms of either the Artistic License or the

      GNU General Public License, which may be found in the Perl 5 source kit.

       

      Complete documentation for Perl, including FAQ lists, should be found on

      this system using "man perl" or "perldoc perl".  If you have access to the

      Internet, point your browser at http://www.perl.org/, the Perl Home Page.

      # perl

      use NSH;

       

      I have opened a ticket with support, but though that someone may have run across this.  If not, perhaps the result may help someone in the future...

       

      -Chris