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On The Mark

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The "Day 1" coverage is in on BMC's "The New IT" announcement yesterday, and it is very strong stuff.  Check it out.

 

Want to see an example of consumerization done right? Check out the latest version of MyIT, BMC’s help desk interface

Jack Madden, BrianMadden.com

February 18, 2014

 

Highlights:

Want to see an example of consumerization done right? Check out the latest version of MyIT, BMC’s help desk interface

 

BMC Software is announcing the 2.0 release of MyIT, a consumerization- and mobile-friendly front end for their IT service management products. After getting a good look at the demo I was quite impressed, and I think it’s one of the better examples of how to “do consumerization.”

 

…after getting a demo (of MyIT) and talking with BMC’s Jason Frye, I went away with a feeling that this was a good example of all that “let’s change the way IT interacts with users.”

 

Clearly BMC has put a lot of consideration into MyIT, and it looks like a product I’d be happy to use.

 

BMC leverages social media to eliminate help desk tickets

Mike Vizard, IT Business Edge

February 18, 2014

 

Highlights:

BMC Software wants to eliminate the whole notion of a level-one job ticket when it comes to IT support

…with the latest version of BMC MyIT, it’s now possible for IT organizations to collaboratively address most routine IT support issues without ever generating a help desk support ticket.

…one of the primary benefits of investing in IT support software from BMC is that it provides the ability to self-service end user needs while still giving IT the visibility it needs to identify issues and trends.

At the moment, internal IT organizations are under a lot of pressure to not only be more efficient, but also provide end users with a customer support experience that reminds them of the value of having an internal IT organization.

…transforming the help desk experience is as much an exercise in internal IT marketing as it is good economics. After all, when it comes to internal IT these days, perception is the new reality.


BMC Software delivers ‘The New IT’ with three pioneering products

Elizabeth White, SYS-CON Media

February 18, 2014

 

Highlights:

The new products - BMC MyIT 2.0, BMC AppZone 2.0 and BMC Remedyforce Winter '14 - showcase the company's commitment to using mobile, social, and cloud technologies. BMC believes these technologies, along with automated and industrialized IT service delivery, are the defining characteristics of the new IT.

 

BMC launches new MyIT, AppZone, Remedyforce apps, UI

Larry Dignan, ZDNet

February 18, 2014

 

Highlights:

BMC Software on Tuesday launched new versions of its MyIT, AppZone and Remedyforce and retooled the user experience to revolve around social, mobile and gamification. The releases serve as another indication that enterprise software vendors are stepping up their focus on user interface and experience

 

BMC Software Reveals Products To Support Cloud, Social and Mobile Applications

Arnal Dayaratna, Cloud Computing Today

February 18, 2014

 

Highlights:

BMC Software today announced news of three products that both define and illustrate the way in which mobile, cloud and social networking technologies are transforming the landscape of enterprise IT.

 

BMC Reimagines IT: IT 2.0, Mobile, Social and Apple-like

Rob Enderle, The Enderle Group, IT Business Edge

February 18, 2014

 

Highlights:

BMC has apparently taken the core concepts from this Apple support model and updated them with current thinking and technology to give everyone, even Apple users, a better IT experience.BMC is calling this “The New IT.” I’m calling it revolutionary.

 

BMC makes the help desk more social

By Joab Jackson, IDG Syndicated in CIO, PCWorld, TechWorld, ComputerWorld

February 18, 2014

 

Highlights:

BMC Software wants to bring some social networking magic to the formal world of the IT help desk.

Most employees lose an average of 18 hours each month to computer problems, according to a survey from Forrester Research. The IT analyst company estimated that this lost time can cost organizations US$3,700 per employee per year.  BMC is banking that a bit of embedded social networking can reduce this cost.

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BMC_ITTrends_Joe-Panettieri_Blog.jpgThanks to Joe Panettieri for taking part in the Marking Predictions for 14 series. You can see the complete list of contributor posts via that link.

 

Joe is executive VP and editorial director of Nine Lives Media. He contributes to several outlets on the web, including The VAR Guy, MSPmentor and Talkin' Cloud—the leading online communities for VARs, managed services providers (MSPs) and cloud services providers (CSPs).


You can also follow Joe on Twitter
@joepanettieri.

 

Here are Joe’s responses:

 

 

 

1.  Describe in one sentence what you do and why you’re good at it.

Founder of The VAR Guy, the leading blog in the IT channel. http://www.thevarguy.com

 

 

 

2.  Cloud Computing, Big Data or Consumerization: which trend do you feel is having the most impact on IT today and why?

Cloud and conumerization together are having the most impact. Low-cost mobile devices, Wi-Fi and cloud services have combined to give all consumers and business users anywhere, anytime information access. Without that, Big Data never happens.

 

 

 

3.  What do you think is the biggest misconception about Cloud computing/Big Data/Consumerization?

Biggest misconception is that Cloud is a cost save and lacks security. I don't think cloud is about saving money. Instead, it's about rolling out applications and services faster than otherwise possible, at a predictable monthly cost. Also, folks worry about cloud security but I feel safer with my data on a cloud server than I do on a corporate server. True cloud businesses are security experts. I don't think you can say the same for thousands of small and midsize businesses running IT.

 

 

 

4.  Which (Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization) trend has surprised you most in the last five years?

The denial that some corporate IT managers still have toward cloud computing. If you ignore the cloud wave in IT, you'll wind up unemployed.

 

 

 

5.  How has Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization had the biggest impact in YOUR life?

I co-founded Nine Lives Media in 2008 as a pure digital media company will all services in the cloud. That wouldn't have been possible 3 or 5 years earlier. The result was double-digit revenue growth every year, profits in year one, and a successful exit in 2011. I remained with the company post-sale because we still had far more to build around the brands.

 

 

6.  On a lighter note - If Cloud/Big Data/Consumerization could be personified by a superhero, which superhero would it be and why?

The Flash — because he can be everywhere at once.

 

 

 

7.  What aspect of (Cloud Computing/Big Data/ Consumerization) are you most excited about in the future, and what excites you about it?

The ability to empower entrepreneurs to compete instantly/overnight in big markets. I suspect at some point in my career I will launch additional products and services, and maybe even companies. And when I do, I won't ever fear the entrenched giants.

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HOUSTON, January 30, 2014 – BMC Software today issued the following statement regarding the speculation in the press concerning the Target data breach:

 

There have been several articles in the press speculating about the Target breach.  BMC Software has received no information from Target or the investigators regarding the breach. In some of those articles, BMC products were mentioned in two different ways.

 

The first was a mention of a "bladelogic.exe" reference in the attack. The executable name “bladelogic.exe” does not exist in any piece of legitimate BMC software.  McAfee has issued a security advisory stating that: "The reference to “bladelogic” is a method of obfuscation.  The malware does not compromise, or integrate with, any BMC products in any way.

 

The second reference was to a password that was possibly utilized as part of the attack, with the implication that it was a BMC password.  BMC has confirmed that the password mentioned in the press is not a BMC-generated password.

 

At this point, there is nothing to suggest that BMC BladeLogic or BMC Performance Assurance has a security flaw or was compromised as part of this attack.

 

Malware is a problem for all IT environments.  BMC asks all of our customers to be diligent in ensuring that their environments are secure and protected.

Mark Stouse

Honored and humbled

Posted by Mark Stouse Jan 27, 2014
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1625629_10203009908910675_1945935581_n.jpg

If you know me, you know I’m just a little bit passionate about my work.  All of it, actually, but particularly the bit about helping the marketing and communications profession connect what it does to actual, real-deal business outcomes.

Even in the earlier days of my career, it drove me crazy when business leaders looked at my successful results and concluded that it was “all good,” but that they couldn’t see the business impact. For years, I thought they were Philistines who “didn’t get it” – but then fate intervened.  I left my profession and went to the “dark side” – and over the next several years I became a business leader running a business myself.

It’s amazing what you learn when you stand in the other guys’ shoes. During the course of the 1990s, my experience as a GM and successful innovator and entrepreneur completely re-oriented my thinking.  When I had another opportunity to return to the marketing and comms profession in 2000, I resolved to do so but with a completely different take on the issue of business impact.  Five years later, a seminal conversation with one of the most famous tech industry CEOs catapulted me into a project that has changed my life and that of many of my colleagues along the way – the creation of the Influence Scoring System, or ISS.

Over the course of its development, ISS has been deployed at scale across multiple public companies and five major agencies, and the number of business leaders who have given their input to refine the platform is now in the hundreds.

A big fast-forward -- last Thursday night, I was honored and humbled to have my work in this area validated by my peers at the famous SABRE Awards in San Francisco, where I was named Innovator of the Year.  The ISS measurement and analytics platform also won for Best Gamification, which was really cool.

It struck me again that night – as it has on other nights in the past – that Innovation can be a lonely pursuit, but Successful Innovation always involves a lot of people, be they close friends, helpful strangers, professional colleagues or intimate family.  As always in these situations, I was recognized for the hard work of many colleagues and collaborators over the years, so these awards belong to them as well.  ISS would not be real – and I would not have beeen standing there with this recognition – without the participation and friendship of many people. But there are a number of people who deserve special thanks, and I’d very much like to do that now.

Bob Beauchamp, BMC's CEO, and Kia Behnia, our CTO, were the first business leaders to see the innovation in ISS.  In 2009, ISS was recognized as part of the BMC Innovation Award program – the first time ever for innovation outside the company’s core business.  It was the first 'credential' given to ISS, and anyone who has ever created something like this knows the importance of that sort of encouragement.


ISS also owes a ton to the active collaboration of many Business, Finance and Sales leaders at BMC, Honeywell and many other companies to connect the dots between marketing and communications investment and sales productivity impact, particularly in the areas of deal expansion and sales velocity improvements. At BMC, I’d like to specifically thank APAC Sales leader Chip Salyards and EMEA Sales leader Jason Andrews, both of whom have offered a lot of encouragement and insight since 2006.


When I stood on stage Thursday evening in San Francisco, I was very conscious of being in the presence of many of the truly awesome people in my chosen profession.  I got the nod this year, but there were so many others who deserved awards for their amazing work.  It was an honor just to be nominated with them. The marketing and communications field continues to change in revolutionary ways. I’m amazed at how far it’s come during my career, and I’m very excited to be a part of where it’s going.

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Thanks to Barton George for taking part in the Marking Predictions for 14 series. You can see the complete list of contributor posts via that link. 


Barton is the director of developer programs for Dell. Project Sputnik is an example of his work in that role. You can keep up with him @barton808 on Twitter or check out his blog at bartongeorge.net.


Here are Barton’s responses:

 

1.   Describe in one sentence what you do and why you¹re good at it.

I lead the Cloud Developer programs for the company so Dell can better serve them. Developers are one of the most influential, but least understood groups within IT today.


 

2.   Cloud Computing, Big Data or Consumerization: which trend do you feel is having the most impact on IT today and why?

Consumerization, because it sets the bar for how technology should look and be designed.  Workers want technology in the workplace that is as easy to use and intuitive as the consumer applications and tech products they use at home.  Consumerization has set a high bar for IT but one that I believe will ultimately benefit all involved through greater adoption, satisfaction and productivity.


 

3.   What do you think is the biggest misconception about Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization?

That cloud computing is primarily about cutting costs. the bigger reason for adopting cloud, whether you are a large or small company is agility.  In the case of small companies Its removed the need for huge upfront costs and lets you get started right away.


 

4.   Which (Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization) trend has surprised you most in the last five years?

Consumerization: it’s only been in the last five years that consumer-focused hardware and software has become the standard for functionality and ease of use in the workplace, from Facebook-like social networking applied to enterprise applications far and wide or mobile phone functionality that debuts first in the consumer space. 


 

5.   How has Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization had the biggest impact in YOUR life to date?

Cloud computing. For me personally, it’s the area that I have focused on and the developments and evolution of cloud functionality has allowed me to talk to a wide variety customers, to understand their needs and how they are adopting technology today.


 

6.   On a lighter note - If Cloud/Big Data/Consumerization could be personified by a superhero, which superhero would it be and why?

I think big data is like Tony Stark. It will reach superhero status, but it will take the efforts of some really big brains to help get it there.


 

7.   What aspect of (Cloud Computing/Big Data/ Consumerization) are you most excited about in the future, and what excites you about it?

Consumerization, because by driving good design it makes my life at work easier. In my view, removing barriers to adoption of technology remains key, and consumerization is helping to knock those barriers down.

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Thanks to Krishnan Subramanian for taking part in the Marking Predictions for 14 series. You can see the complete list of contributor posts via that link. 


Krish is director of the OpenShift strategy for Red Hat. In his role at Red Hat, he focuses on platform services, infrastructure and the role of open source in the services area. He is also the founder of Rishidot Research and contributes to Cloud Ave. since the site was started.


Here are Krish’s responses:


 

1.   Describe in one sentence what you do and why you¹re good at it.

I work at Red Hat as Director of their PaaS strategy and before that an analyst focusing on cloud computing for several years researching on enterprise adoption of modern technologies.


 

2.   Cloud Computing, Big Data or Consumerization: which trend do you feel is having the most impact on IT today and why?

Today, Cloud Computing has the maximum impact but it is strongly aided in its maturity by big data and consumerization. Cloud’s impact can be felt in many areas. For large enterprises, it offered them a more efficient and cost effective platform to trust their entire business. For SMBs and mid-market segments, it enabled them to compete with large organizations at a price they can afford.


 

3.   What do you think is the biggest misconception about Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization?

Biggest misconception about Cloud Computing is about its security. It is neither more secure nor less secure. Rather, it changes how we look at security and smart organizations can stay secure while reaping the benefits of cloud computing.


Biggest misconception about Big Data is that just the sheer volume is enough to solve the problems of modern enterprise. Without any clue on what questions to ask, it is just a lump of data. You need a proper strategy around data before venturing into the big data journey.


 

4.   Which (Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization) trend has surprised you most in the last five years?

The rise of open source software in cloud computing. When cloud computing started off there were pundits on both sides of the equation who proclaimed that open source is dead. Rather, it is not just thriving but it is the core to modern cloud technologies.


 

5.   How has Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization had the biggest impact in YOUR life to date?

I live in cloud (have most of my life stored there), I wear sensors in my body (including my mobile phone) and have sensors and other internet of things offerings in my home and I take advantage of the data these sensors provide to better manage my life.

 


6.   On a lighter note - If Cloud/Big Data/Consumerization could be personified by a superhero, which superhero would it be and why?

Spiderman. Because cloud is nimble and agile like Spiderman.


 

7.   What aspect of (Cloud Computing/Big Data/ Consumerization) are you most excited about in the future, and what excites you about it?

I am excited about Platform as a Service offerings and how big data + PaaS is going to reshape enterprises in the coming years.

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BMC_ITTrends_Matt-Rosoff_Blog.jpgThanks to Matt Rosoff for taking part in the Marking Predictions for 14 series. You can see the complete list of contributor posts via that link.

 

Matt Rosoff is the editorial director at CITEworld, an IDG Enterprise publication focused on the use of consumer technology in the enterprise. He's spent years covering enterprise technology and also has a deep understanding of how consumer technology is impacting it.


Here are Matt's responses:


 

1. Describe in one sentence what you do and why you’re good at it.

I run CITEworld, the foremost publication devoted to the intersection of consumer and enterprise technology. I’ve been reporting on the tech industry since 1995, and am immensely grateful for my 10 years as an IT industry analyst at Directions on Microsoft, which gave me a strong grounding in the enterprise mindset and knowledge of Microsoft’s broad consumer and enterprise product portfolio.

 

 

2. Cloud Computing, Big Data or Consumerization: which trend do you feel is having the most impact on IT today and why?

Consumerization, if you define it properly. Consumerization is about much more than people bringing their own smartphones to work. It describes an entire shift in mindset that puts the user and the business as the driver of technology choices, with IT as an enabler rather than a restrictive force. Cloud computing fits into consumerization – cloud-based apps are more easily accessible from multiple types of devices in any location, with less maintenance time on the part of IT, and customers are making more of their purchases in the cloud than ever before. Big data fits into consumerization – recently, Gartner said that the rising trend in Business Intelligence is about giving end-users ad hoc access to data they need right now, rather than helping IT help the finance department create pretty weekly reports. Consumerization is the overturning of 30 years of the social compact between IT and the end user.

 

 

3.   What do you think is the biggest misconception about Cloud computing/Big Data/Consumerization?

That the rise of mobile devices creates some kind of inherent security threat that is different or worse the PC-centric workplace of yesteryear. If anything, mobile devices are easier to lock down, with less local storage for storing company data, and less vulnerability to rogue apps than the PC is.

 

 

4. Which (Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization) trend has surprised you most in the last five years?

The fast decline of the Windows client monopoly and the rise of a true multiplatform client environment – iOS, Android, and Windows all have a place among end users.

 

 

5.   How has Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization had the biggest impact in YOUR life?

I’m able to use my iPhone to get work done almost anywhere. That was inconceivable five years ago, even with laptops.

 

 

6.   On a lighter note - If Cloud/Big Data/Consumerization could be personified by a superhero, which superhero would it be and why?

Platicman. Infinitely flexible.

 

 

7.   What aspect of (Cloud Computing/Big Data/ Consumerization) are you most excited about in the future, and what excites you about it?

I’m most excited about the revolution in enterprise app design that offers more functionality to end users in a simple, accessible fashion, on the client platform of their choice. When IT controlled the enterprise buying process, vendors made their products for IT leaders, running down checklists of features. Too often, the result was expensive complicated shelfware that was never deployed or seldom used once deployed. With consumerization, vendors must concentrate on usability – otherwise users will find their own alternatives, completely outside the control of IT.

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BMC Eric Blum, blog.jpgNext up is from the BMC team is Eric Blum’s post for the Marking Predictions for 14 series. You can see the complete list of contributor posts via that link.

 

Eric serves BMC as the Vice President CTO for EMEA, with a particular focus on our cloud efforts and business service management. He also heads up the BMC Enterprise Service Division in France. You can follow him on Twitter @Eric_P_Blum.

 

Here are Eric’s responses:

 

1.  Describe in one sentence what you do and why you¹re good at it.

In one word: Transformation.

 

Having the chance to interface with multiple customers from multiple countries and industries, I am in the perfect spot to capture Business & IT trends, Resistance factors and competition.

 

It is my passion to articulate and architect the future state of IT Management, challenge BMC and our customers’ maturity to endorse it, and detail the transformation plan to evolve towards it with innovative technologies and practices.

 

 

2.  Cloud Computing, Big Data or Consumerization: Which trend do you feel is having the most impact on IT today and why?

Cloud computing in his broadest definition impacts IT at all levels. At Application development, more than 75% of companies will have taken the turn to new development of PaaS-based frameworks (e.g. Force.com). 80% of companies already have 6 or more Business critical processes automated with SaaS. And needless to say that IaaS is now a commodity for most companies using AWS, Azure or so many other providers.

 

In that sense, all companies are now embracing multi-sourced delivery, which is fundamentally changing their role to an IS Integrator and provider.

  • Companies are re-defining themselves around a cloud-first strategy.
  • IT Management & governance will be the key to their success.
  • Without Cloud, Big Data & Consumerization will struggle to become mainstream.

 

 

3.  What do you think is the biggest misconception about Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization?

Believing that there are evolutionary steps of known capabilities is fundamentally wrong;

  • Cloud computing is not outsourcing.
  • Big Data is not Business Intelligence.
  • Consumerization is not web turned into mobile.

 

Those 3 technologies are disruptive. New business model shall be imagined and IT shall approach this with a Greenfield mindset.


 

4.  Which (Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization) trend has surprised you most in the last five years?

I was surprised by the accelerated adoption of those technologies by the business entities which quickly generated shadow IT.

 

IT was too much cast into their standard practices to endorse the capabilities and left the room to external specialized Service Providers.

That had a snowball effect, and funded the business development of Cloud providers, which accelerated the innovation.

The gap between corporate IT and Service Providers to support the business only grew then.

 

I am still surprised about the inertia of most corporate Infrastructure departments, and how long it takes them to be fully Service Oriented.

 

 

5.  How has Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization had the biggest impact in YOUR life to date?

Having to deal with 3 new disruptive technologies at the same time, is the dream of any CTO in his industry.

The art of the possible is immense, and the opportunity is without limit for BMC.

 

Even more personally, turning myself into an ultra-marathon / X-Trail runner, I could not do this without a large set of SaaS based services for Geo-tracking, Heartbeat & Blood pressure monitoring, Food Logging, Nutrition management, intelligent weight scale, not forgetting Social and community network for self-coaching & motivation.

 

All this is in an extreme mobile and unfriendly environment (from cities around the world, to High summits, to deep forests, to deserts), anytime, with different gears & sensors depending the sport. This has enabled me to lose 37kg in 7 months, and to prepare myself for my next adventure: crossing the Negev Desert - 280km in 8 days, starting this Dec 28th.

 

I am now turning this into a program, hoping to rally as many people as possible: Running into the Digital Age. Stay tuned as it is about to be rolled out!

 

 

6.  On a lighter note - If Cloud/Big Data/Consumerization could be personified by a superhero, which superhero would it be and why?

 

Batman for sure, because of his dual personality:

  • Cloud: He can achieve what he wants because there is no limit to his strength but it could be misused and goes against him (think about the real cost of Cloud when mismanaged).
  • Big Data: He seems to know everything real time but this is getting him into challenging questions about his roots and purpose (Are all customers happy about the perspective of Big Data and the outcomes).
  • Consumerization: I love his car & his fashion!

 

 

7.  What aspect of (Cloud Computing/Big Data/ Consumerization) are you most excited about in the future, and what excites you about it?

With Digital Service Management, BMC has a unique opportunity to define a new way to run IT and leave most of his competitors behind. This is happening now with a number of our customers.

 

The internet of things with billions of smart objects connected, will take it to another level where every aspects of our life will be enabled by Technology based services. Thinking that there could be BMC technology behind it, and that I will have had a modest contribution to it, gets my passion for IT to another level, again…

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David Williams.jpgHappy 2014! I’ll kick off the new year with David Williams’ post for the Marking Predictions for 14 series. You can see the complete list of contributor posts via that link.

 

David Williams is VP of strategy in the Office of the CTO for BMC. In that role, David focuses on David focuses on availability and performance monitoring, IT operations automation and management architectures. You can read his posts at his Opsleuth blog, or follow him on Twitter @Opsleuth.

 

1. Describe in one sentence what you do

As a member of the Office of the CTO, I provide the vision and strategy to ensure BMC provides products to meet tomorrow’s diverse IT management challenges and I am also responsible for taking complex subject matter and making it easier for people to understand what it is and the value it provides. When it comes to strategy I've found the hardest things are deciding what not to do. 


2. Cloud Computing, Big Data or Consumerization: which trend do you feel is having the most impact on IT today and why?

For many organizations Cloud computing has become the way IT is delivered to the business. It will continue to introduce challenges as it evolves from a way to attain the capacity to one where it is used to deliver sophisticated IT services. Big data has the most promise but many are still learning how to harness the value. Consumerization is the most disruptive as it cannot be avoided and it cannot be something that will be addressed when the IT organization is ready.  Consumerization is not just about mobility, the internet of things or instant market place application downloads it's about the impact people have when they collaborate, socialize and share experiences. Good IT experiences are shared quickly. Bad ones are shared much faster.  IT consumers are increasingly self-sufficient. Upon an IT issue being experienced the first option is trial and error (e.g. restarting and changing devices and locations) if unsuccessful it will be followed by soliciting the help of friends and colleagues, then by on-line support groups, blogs and search and lastly, a call is made to the service desk. This is just one instance of a behavior that will change the way IT consumers are breaking traditional IT thinking. Consumerization—it's happening ready or not.

 

3. What do you think is the biggest misconception about Cloud computing/Big Data/Consumerization?

Misconceptions include; Cloud is done. Big data value is understood and Consumerization can be managed by the IT management organization.

 

4. Which (Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization) trend has surprised you most in the last five years?

The speed with which Consumerization continues to change the way IT is delivered, consumed and measured both motivates and concerns me. The impact it has is becoming significant and arguably, for the first time IT consumers are now calling the shots. They increasingly decide what is used, how it is used, where it is used from whatever device they choose. Consumers, not IT operations, monitor and decide how good IT services are. IT operations executives without a strategy to embrace Consumerization yet believe they have control over how IT services are consumed will find themselves increasingly challenged by business demands and evaluated using criteria outside their knowledge and control. The tidal-wave of innovative consumer focused IT services and technology combined with the influx and behaviors of the digital native has created a tipping point where the datacenter, the traditional IT reference point, is no longer the center of the IT universe.

 

5. How has Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization had the biggest impact in YOUR life to date?

Not wanting to sound like a broken record (does that analogy have any relevance today?) but my day to day interaction with IT has changed dramatically due to the devices I now use, the way I use them, the ways I communicate, collaborate, socialize, and work. I'm positive behind the scenes are cloud computing services and big data (analytics) enabling me have this experience but my expectation of IT service is the same no matter what I choose to use or where I am.  I’ve become intolerant to delay. A slow connection or web page refresh is the difference between completing a transaction or moving onto somewhere else more responsive. Not so long ago I could not understand how I could live just using mobile devices with everything in the cloud. Now I’m baffled how IT companies can possibly remain relevant when their marketed differentiation is about adding local storage, a big display and keyboard to a tablet!  What next? A floppy disk drive?

 

6. On a lighter note - If Cloud/Big Data/Consumerization could be personified by a superhero, which superhero would it be and why?

Cloud is Iron Man. When he works he is unbeatable, but when he has a mechanical failure it's going to be a bad day – for him.

Big data is group of heroes, the fantastic four, each with a specialized skill needed to solve a specific, common challnege.

Consumerization is Spider Man. Not sure why. He is just the coolest of the superheroes and I didn't want to leave him out.

 

7. What aspect of (Cloud Computing/Big Data/ Consumerization) are you most excited about in the future, and what excites you about it?

Big data will continue to evolve especially if the value can be realized without incurring high costs, high skills and high complexity.  Big data for the masses will be enabled with tools designed to allow users to find answers to their business questions without having to wait for IT’s permission or soliciting the support of IT resources. As a wise man once told me - “it’s all about the data”.

 

Cloud will continue to have an impact from multiple perspectives, it is helping drive high levels of process and infrastructure standardization, increase collaboration and remove the traditional IT organizational silos (a key contributor to IT management inefficiency) and as technology is leveraged more effectively (e.g. the inclusion of capacity optimization to ensure intelligence provisioning and reduce risk associated with dynamic changes) cloud will continue to become a primary way to increase IT value driving business efficiency and growth.

 

Consumerization is without doubt the area that excites me the most it will change the way IT services are chosen, costed, licensed, delivered and measured. The IT consumer is becoming the center of the IT universe no longer monitored like a peripheral device or simple known as ‘trouble ticket 353’. From an IT management perspective the lens is no longer maniacally focused on the data center because that is no longer where IT value is measured.

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Rob Hirschfeld - Dell.jpgThanks to Rob Hirschfeld for taking part in the Marking Predictions for 14 series. You can see the complete list of contributor posts via that link.

 

Rob is a Sr. Distinguished Engineer at Dell. In this role, he is the senior technical lead for Dell’s OpenStack/ Hadoop solutions and is one of the founders of the Crowbar Project. Rob also serves as a community Board Member of the OpenStack Foundation.  You can keep up with Rob by checking out his Agile in the Clouds blog, or you can follow him on Twitter @zehicle.

 

Here are Rob’s responses:

 

1.  Describe in one sentence what you do and why you’re good at it.

I specialize in architecture for infrastructure software for scale data center operations (aka “cloud”) and I have 14 years of battle scars that inform my designs.

 

2.  Cloud Computing, Big Data or Consumerization: Which trend do you feel is having the most impact on IT today and why?

Cloud, Data & Consumerization are all connected, so there’s no one clear “most impactful” winner except that all three are forcing IT to rethink how we handle operations.   The pace of change for these categories (many of which are open source driven) is so fast that traditional IT governance cannot keep up.  I’m specifically talking about the DevOps and Lean Software Delivery paradigms.  These approaches do not mean that we’re trading speed for quality; in fact, I’ve seen that we’re adopting techniques that deliver both higher quality and speed.

 

3.  What do you think is the biggest misconception about Cloud computing/Big Data/Consumerization?

That someone can purchase them as a SKU.  These are really architectural concepts that impact how we solve problems instead of specific products.  My experience is that customers overlook their need to understand how to change their business to take advantage of these technologies.  It’s the same classic challenge for ROI from most new technologies – they don’t exist apart from the business matching changes to the business to leverage them.

 

4.  Which (Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization) trend has surprised you most in the last five years?

Open source has surprised me because we’ve seen it transform from a cost concern into a supply chain concern.  When I started doing open source work for Dell, customers were very interested in innovation and controlling license costs.  This has really changed over the last few years.  Today, customers are more concerned with community participation and transparency of their product code base.  This surprised me until I realized that they are really seeking to ensure that they had maximum control and visibility into their “IT Supply Chain.”   It may seem like a paradox, but open source software is uniquely positioned to help companies maintain more control of their critical IT because they are not tightly coupled to a single vendor.

 

5.  How has Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization had the biggest impact in YOUR life to date?

Beyond it being my career, I believe these technologies have created a new degree of freedom for me.  I’m answering these questions from the SFO airport where I’m carrying all of the tools I need to do my job in a space small enough to fit under the seat in front of me plus a free Wifi connection.  I believe we are only just learning how access to information and portable computing will change our experience.  This learning process will be both liberating and painful as we work out the right balances between access, identity and privacy.

 

6.  On a lighter note - If Cloud/Big Data/Consumerization could be personified by a superhero, which superhero would it be and why?

The Hulk.  Looks like a friendly geek but it’s going to crush you if you’re not careful.

 

7.  What aspect of (Cloud Computing/Big Data/ Consumerization) are you most excited about in the future, and what excites you about it?

The Internet of Things (even if I hate the term) is very exciting because we’re moving into a place where we have real ways to connect our virtual and physical lives.  That translates into cool technologies like self-driving cars and smart power utilities.  I think it will also motivate a revolution in how people interact with computers and each other.  It’s going to open up a whole new dimension on our personal interaction with our surroundings.   I’m specifically thinking about a book “Rainbows End” by Vernor Vinge that paints this future in vivid detail.

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bmc_chalkboard_deans_blog.jpgThanks to David H. Deans for taking part in the Marking Predictions for 14 series. You can see the complete list of contributor posts via that link.


David H. Deans is Principal Consultant and founder of GeoActive Group, a company that provides technology, media and telecom marketing consulting.


Here are David’s responses:


1. Describe in one sentence what you do and why you're good at it.

I observe and report on the ongoing evolution of a Global Networked Economy — my opinions are based on two decades of multifaceted experience and accomplishments since the internet became a worldwide phenomenon.


2. Cloud Computing, Big Data or Consumerization: which trend do you feel is having the most impact on IT today and why?

Cloud computing is having the most impact, by far. Read "IT Doesn't Matter" by Nicholas Carr to understand why.


3. What do you think is the biggest misconception about Cloud computing/Big Data/Consumerization?

Biggest misconception is that new technology adoption leads to better business outcomes. It doesn't; that requires talent (most companies have a talent-puddle of people who can truly deliver strategic advantage from deployments).


4. Which (Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization) trend has surprised you most in the last five years?

The slow adoption of personal Cloudbook computers (commonly known as Chromebooks); I believe that it's a combination of issues—First, I assumed that everyone would understand that Chromebooks and cloud services are the perfect pair of business tools that are optimized for enabling people to focus on their application needs -- the technology is transparent, there's nothing new to learn, it just works. Second, I didn't expect that pundits and analysts -- that have never used this combination – would be so very vocal in their opposition (negative editorial, macho jokes and even outright lies about performance). Google (and partners) marketing was limited and unconvincing, to counter all the negativity.  That being said, Intel and partners spent a bundle on promoting expensive Ultrabooks that gained little market share, so maybe marketing isn't the best way to lower the barriers to greater adoption. Regardless, I use a Samsung Chromebook and Google apps and appreciate the value—I've never been asked to be an advocate.


5. How has Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization had the biggest impact in YOUR life to date?

I'm able to accomplish more with free Google cloud-based services than the typical large enterprise software user. I use email a lot less than I did before. Google Drive made my workflow a lot easier—I just keep one copy of what I want to share for collaboration, I can toggle the access privileges. RSS feeds and Twitter are amazing resources as well. Google Hangouts are integrated into Gmail and Google+, which are great at enabling impromptu interactions with trusted contacts.


6. On a lighter note - If Cloud/Big Data/Consumerization could be personified by a superhero, which superhero would it be and why?

Flash Gordon - because speed and agility are more useful in today's business than superior strength or bulk.


7. What aspect of (Cloud Computing/Big Data/ Consumerization) are you most excited about in the future, and what excites you about it?

When open APIs become the lingua franca of business technology and all legacy barriers to market entry collapse. By that, I mean open APIs, in general, have enabled any basic common info stream to be tapped by independent software developers that can re-purpose that content in creative (value-added) ways. Now, when I imagine doing the same thing for basic networking capabilities—particularly voice and visual communication—that's really exciting. Google Voice and similar services would benefit from outside developer talent ideas.


Granted, access to free APIs can be taken away just as easily as they are granted. Regardless, when you dramatically expand the size of the talent pool by adding loosely-coupled resources to your affiliate network, the collaborative power of the ecosystem is greater than anything that you could ever expect to accomplish by intentional design. In my opinion, the Android ecosystem is an interesting case study in the power of what I'd call "accidental quantum competitive advantage" in action.

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bmc_chalkboard_shel.jpgThanks to Shel Israel for taking part in the Marking Predictions for 14 series. You can see the complete list of contributor posts via that link.

 

Shel Israel is a tech blogger and author of several books about social media and technology. He co-authored his latest book, The Age of Context with Robert Scoble.

 

Here are Shel’s responses:

 

1. Describe in one sentence what you do and why you’re good at it.

I'm a story teller focused on the interaction between people and technology.

 

2. Cloud Computing, Big Data or Consumerization: which trend do you feel is having the most impact on IT today and why?

I think the answer is "yes." All three of these issues are having a profound impact on IT. More important is that the rate of change is accelerating. Technology keeps getting faster-better-cheaper, and therefore adoption rates are accelerating. The enterprise has to me more adaptive and more adoptive than at any point in history or they will be left behind. Too often, I find enterprise decision-makers struggling so hard with yesterday's issues, that they don't notice that new, more complex issues erupted this morning.

 

3. What do you think is the biggest misconception about Cloud computing/Big Data/Consumerization?

People fear both because they are freaky. Cloud and data, make people worry about privacy. Consumerization means that the enterprise really need to know more about who you are, where you are, what your interests are and what your intent is. To do all that, they need to collect and store data that is accessible from the cloud.

 

4. Which (Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization) trend has surprised you most in the last five years?

I'll go with Scoble on this. Open Source is a fundamental change whose importance will continue as far into the future as I can see.

 

5. How has Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization had the biggest impact in YOUR life to date?

All this promising and disturbing change created a need for Age of Context, a book that explains it better than anything else so far. That has allow me to write the book with Robert and that is a huge personal milestone.

 

6. On a lighter note - If Cloud/Big Data/Consumerization could be personified by a superhero, which superhero would it be and why

Batman, because he saw the coming storm and worked to make the forces of good prevail. Also he had the coolest tools and a car that was better than a Tesla.

 

7. What aspect of (Cloud Computing/Big Data/ Consumerization) are you most excited about in the future, and what excites you about it?

The modern enterprise has the opportunity to know every customer and prospect on a level so granular, that the Internet is becoming the new Cheers--a place where everyone knows your name, and the merchants can serve you goods and services to your personal preference as you walk in through the portal. Our devices are becoming Personal Contextual Assistants that know you better than your spouse knows you and often understands your intent before you do. This allows merchants to make offers to people based on who they are, where they are, the time of day, week or year. The sort of close, personal relationship that buyers and sellers once had, before computers, in simpler times is now available on a global level and it is a benefit to all parties. It is more efficient. There will be less marketing noise and more satisfied customers. These are extremely positive times.

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chalkboard - Robert Scoble.jpgThanks to Robert Scoble for taking part in Marking Predictions for 14.


Robert Scoble is a tech blogger and Startup Liaison for Rackspace. His goal in that role is to help small teams have impact with cloud computing technology. He co-authored his latest book, The Age of Context with Shel Israel.


Robert is the first in a lengthening line of folks whose 2014 predictions we will be spotlighting over the next several weeks.

 

Here are Robert’s responses:

 

1.  Describe in one sentence what you do and why you’re good at it.

 

Rackspace pays me to study the future and the innovators building it and I'm good at it because I've built one of the biggest social media distribution networks and I have more inbound than other journalists.

 

2.  Cloud Computing, Big Data or Consumerization: which trend do you feel is having the most impact on IT today and why?

 

Big data. In the Age of Context we're going to be asked to have 100 to 1,000 times more data about our businesses and our customers. That comes straight from the exec team at Ritz Carlton (among others, including many automobile manufacturers we interviewed for our book, "Age of Context.") Translation? Our companies are going to need much better data infrastructure than they have today.

 

3.  What do you think is the biggest misconception about Cloud computing/Big Data/Consumerization?

 

The big misconception about cloud computing is that it's not safe -- but that view is quickly fading as many Fortune 1,000 businesses bet on cloud computing from Salesforce, Rackspace, Amazon, Box, and others.

 

4.  Which (Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization) trend has surprised you most in the last five years?

 

The move to open source databases like Mongo is most surprising along with the move to NoSQL databases. Makes sense because our businesses are being asked to do more web scale kinds of workloads which require far different approaches than Oracle was built to support.

 

5.  How has Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization had the biggest impact in YOUR life to date?

 

There isn't one thing. It's everything. Nearly everything I do has been hit by all three trends from Facebook's impact on my life to the ability to build contextual businesses on top of Hadoop and other big data technologies.

 

6.  On a lighter note - If Cloud/Big Data/Consumerization could be personified by a superhero, which superhero would it be and why?

 

Batman always uses the right tool for the job.

 

7.  What aspect of (Cloud Computing/Big Data/ Consumerization) are you most excited about in the future, and what excites you about it?

 

Our businesses are going to be asked to study more about their businesses and their customers. Sensors, wearable computers, along with huge flows of social and location data are joining together to make a new kind of system possible. A contextual system that knows us at a deep level and serves us. That's what excites me.

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In preparation for 2014, I'm opening the doors of the “On the Mark” blog to some of the most influential players in technology to gain fresh new insights into some of the biggest trends of our time.

 

Call it “Marking Predictions for 14.”  We'll focus on how trends such as cloud computing, consumerization of IT and BYOD, Big Data, and more will impact the industry and our world in 2014.  We’ll also examine the role technology plays in our lives and take a learn more about how it continues to drive one of the greatest social transformations in human history.


I expect the conversations to be informative, surprising and maybe even a little provocative.


Update: Robert Scoble was the first contributor in the series. You can see all posts related to Marking Predictions for 14 via that link. I'll also keep a running list of contributors here:


 

 

Here's what I will be asking:

 

1.   Describe in one sentence what you do and why you’re good at it.

 

2.   Cloud Computing, Big Data or Consumerization: which trend do you feel is having the most impact on IT today and why?

 

3.   What do you think is the biggest misconception about Cloud computing/Big Data/Consumerization?

 

4.   Which (Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization) trend has surprised you most in the last five years?

 

5.   How has Cloud Computing/Big Data/Consumerization had the biggest impact in YOUR life?

 

6.   On a lighter note - If Cloud/Big Data/Consumerization could be personified by a superhero, which superhero would it be and why?

 

7.   What aspect of (Cloud Computing/Big Data/ Consumerization) are you most excited about in the future, and what excites you about it?

 

Stay tuned for the first post in this series.

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dog_pony_vs_data_121213.jpg

The media has a funny way of trying to kill things. Products, companies, even entire categories. Sometimes the prognosticators are right, often they aren’t, but don’t expect editors to stop writing tech industry obituaries any time soon. Call it a byproduct of working in a field defined by its rate of change – and it’s only accelerating.

 

I recently came across a recent InfoWorld article that adds to this trend (add ‘professions’ to the kick-the-bucket list) and got me thinking about the evolving, somewhat intertwined roles of the CIO and CMO.

 

In the article, the author highlights how the consumerization of IT has fundamentally changed CIOs core responsibilities, from providers of technical ‘know how’ and oversight to….something else. There’s no question IT professionals are being asked to do more and tackle new challenges, however it remains to be seen the extent to which these new and expanded responsibilities will change the perception of IT and its broader role in the business. One thing that is for certain is that the future of IT will very much involve closer collaboration with those that most depend on core IT services – employees.

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Click for Larger Image (image courtesy of Luma Partners)

 

In case you haven’t noticed, we’re also in the midst of a similar transformation of marketing. The wave of new marketing products and technologies now available is daunting, and marketers have access to more customer data and feedback about their consumption patterns than ever before. In the past marketers would plan strategy based on assumptions about audience behavior (perhaps informed on some level by focus groups or surveys); now they are able to measure and adjust to sentiment and customer response in almost real-time. While there will always be a need and a place for great creative, the days of Don Draper and the ‘Big Idea’ have clearly given way to more analytical approaches built on data and measurement.

 

Just as consumerization changed expectations for IT organizations, leading marketers are now expected to be far more in tune with the ebb and flow of customer preference and behaviors. Instead of waiting for one killer idea, marketers can test dozens of ideas –simultaneously-- to determine which are most effective.

 

So what can marketers learn from CIOs and IT leaders? Here are a few lessons that come to mind:

 

  • Change is constant; don’t hesitate to take action. Look no further than the advent and adoption of cloud computing to see how quickly a ‘new’ concept can become an industry standard. Leading organizations are those that identify and separate meaningful innovations from fads and take advantage new opportunities before competitors take notice.
  • The customer is always right. Whether you work in marketing or IT, you know that at the end of the day meeting (and exceeding) the expectations of customers is key to ongoing viability of the business. Just as the BYOD movement is a direct response to employees’ desire to use technologies that they find most productive, marketers need to keep an open mind about how customers want to engage with brand and ultimately how they prefer to purchase products/services. Those that are able to measure, assess and react to those preferences quickly are at an advantage.
  • Whatever you do, make sure it accrues to business goals. Ask any IT leader why a crucial technology initiative got derailed and you’ll likely hear a similar refrain: “Something else came up.” No matter the company, there will always be competition for budgets and anything deemed ‘excess’ will be reallocated to whichever business unit or organization makes the strongest business case for why their project is necessary. After years of being perceived as a budgetary black hole, many IT organizations now have the ability to explain – in excruciating detail – associated costs/return for specific initiatives in addition to being able to tell respective business units how much they owe for their portion of the bill. Marketers also have access to an impressive suite of technologies. Make sure you invest wisely in measuring results and know how to translate activities into comprehensible business value.

 

There are countless other lessons CIOs and CMOs can learn from one another. If you have other ideas or want to share your perspective, leave a comment below or you can Tweet me @MarkStouse.

It's amazing what I.T. was meant to be.