How to implement a document or records management system that meets ISO standards

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    As a follow-on to the "Best  Practices in document management systems post, I received an email with a  pointer to a comprehensive doc management process

    I received a great follow up email from Bob, the person who originally asked  me about best practices in  document management systems. He shared what he found as he continued to  research. Here's his note, and it's a very informative one at that! Thanks  Bob!

     

    [This information] might help anyone tasked with finding and implementing  a records management system OR a document management system for any  organization, to properly organize and execute the project.

     

    Australia’s National Archives' DIRKS How-To manual for government entities  tells exactly how, in minute detail, to go about the process of determining your  organization's needs, orchestrating buy-in from your organization, and deciding  on and implementing a records management system AS A FORMAL, ISO-COMPLIANT  PROJECT:

    http://www.naa.gov.au/recordkeeping/dirks/dirksman/contents.html

     

    Technical communicators may not necessarily be schooled in Project  Management fundamentals or ISO guidelines when they are tapped by their  organization to help orchestrate such a project; if this applies to you, you  might take a peek at this; it's jammed with helpful practical advice and it's  the most thorough document of its type that I've found in several months of  dogged web-digging.

     

    One could even probably search/replace the words ‘document management’ for  ‘records management’  and replace "government agency" with "Corporation" and end  up with a fairly usable skeletal methodology for implementing a corporate  document management system, too... as long as you understand the distinction  between 'documents' and 'records'...though I grant this idea might make people  grind their teeth...:-)

     

    Incidentally, there are guidelines and tips vaguely like DIRKS posted on  the websites of various U.S. state Archives - for example, there’s one  at:

    http://www.state.mn.us/ebranch/mhs/preserve/records/tis/tableofcontents.html

     

    Bob says he hopes this helps someone else who finds themselves in a similar  situation someday. Let us know if you find it helpful and if you have any tips  to add.