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Even though monitoring tools, practices and approaches continue to be updated it’s an evolution not a set of dramatic changes.  In the 1990's the focus was on the data center elements because for many that is where a majority of the IT resources were. Over time the need to understand how IT resources were being provided moved monitoring from basic availability to measuring performance and a set of processes and best practices to ensure specific outages and IT service degradations did not occur again.

 

More recently monitoring has evolved in multiple directions. The dynamic nature of the IT infrastructure demands that monitoring is able to keep up with constant change and business priorities.  This demand has created a new set of monitoring tools that dynamically discover IT components, establish relationships through various communication methods and dynamically map, in real-time, how IT resources are used in support of the changing needs of the business. The highly distributed and fragmented IT infrastructure created a demand for tools that can actively search and associate disparate data from disparate sources and then provide, through analysis, information on IT health that could not be achieved by the more traditional monitoring approaches.  And lastly, the way business consumes IT has forced many IT organizations to focus on the end-user experience.

 

Only by focusing on how end-users consume IT resources will the IT organization be able to fully understand and support the business.  To learn more, please visit a new post by David Williams, VP of Strategy for the Office of the CTO, IT monitoring, an old practice still leaving much to learn.