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In this blog I will explain some concepts of vis file parser connector in BCO 9.X Vs TrueSight CO 10.0, what is new in TrueSight CO 10.0 in terms of Visualizer file processing.

 

Vis parser connector in BCO 9.X

 

In 9.X there are two different BPA vis parser ETLs:

  • BMC - BPA 7.5.x/9.x vis files parser
  • BMC - BPA 7.5.x/9.x Virtual Nodes vis files parser

 

The "BMC - BPA 7.5.x/9.x vis files parser" imports data for the following system types from the BPA vis file:

 

  • Standalone (any OS)
  • VMware (data collected via BPA vCenter proxy collection)
  • AIX Power VM/WPAR
  • Solaris LDOM/Zone/DSD
  • HP IVM/nPar/vPar
  • Xen
  • MS HyperV
  • KVM


The 'BMC - BPA 7.5.x/9.x Virtual Nodes vis files parser' ETL imports data for computers in the Visualizer file whose type is VIRTUAL (i.e. nodetype = VIRTUAL and associated SYSTEMD/CAXNODED tables).  This is generally data collected within a VMware guest OS instance by a locally installed collector (or for Windows via proxy collection as well).  The key point is that if the NODE_MODE of the machine is VIRTUAL in CAXNODE table then it will only be imported into BCO via the 'BMC - BPA 7.5.x/9.x Virtual Nodes vis files parser' ETL. Usually if you check the vis file in the T;SYSTEMS section you will see that these systems are the "VIRTUAL" kind. So, you should use BPA VIRTUAL Nodes vis file parser ETL to load systems data from VMWare guests that was collected by a collector running within VMWare guest machine, which only reports virtual resource consumption.

Use the BPA vis file parser to load data that are not of "VIRTUAL" kind. For that, choose the appropriated options (run configuration tab), which could be Standalone, AIX Power VM/WPAR, VMWare, Solaris LDOM/Zone/DSD, XEN, HP IVM/nPar vPar, MS HyperV, KVM. See the online documentation to learn more about Virtual Node vis file parser and vis file parser.

Note that when you import those new computers into BCO they will create new entities in BCO separate from the existing vCenter collected entities.  The Entity Type for the VIRTUAL in-guest collected data will be "VMware - Virtual Node' as opposed to 'VMware - Virtual Machine' which is the entity type for vCenter collected data about the guest.

 

Vis parser connector in TrueSight CO 10


TrueSight Capacity Optimization 10.0 now has the ability to process Virtual nodes along with other platform types in a single connector instance so you only need to parse the Visualizer files through one ETL called BMC - TrueSight Capacity Optimization Gateway VIS files parser even if it contains both VIRTUAL nodes and the other system types. It supports TrueSight Capacity Optimization VIS files versions greater or equal to 7.5.00. Files can be retrieved using the Gateway Manager Web Service or can be read locally to TSCO Application Server (after file transfer from Gateway Server to TSCO AS). This feature is now available for both VIS connector and CDB connector types. There is a built-in task called
Virtual Node Linker in the hierarchy rule to create relationships among systems and virtual nodes. The Virtual Node Linker task connects a VM (an entity that is collected from the Hypervisor) to the corresponding virtual node (an entity that is collected from inside the VM) in Capacity Optimization. Data for these entities is imported from different ETLs, however, the execution sequence of these ETLs does not matter. The name of this relationship between the VM and virtual node entities is identified as GM_ASSOCIATED_TO_VN.

The "BMC - TrueSight Capacity Optimization Gateway VIS files parser" imports data for the following system types:

  • Standalone (any OS)
  • VMware (data collected via BPA vCenter proxy collection)
  • AIX Power VM/WPAR
  • Solaris LDOM/Zone/DSD
  • HP IVM/nPar/vPar
  • Xen
  • MS HyperV
  • KVM
  • Virtual

For additional information, please refer to online documentation.

 

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