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- by Tom Parish, Social Media Consultant

 

 

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Building a robust enterprise architecture that can meet the needs of a business isn’t an option, it’s something every organization has to do. And asking about the ROI  on an enterprise architecture project is like asking about what’s the return on investment of your physical plant. You need to focus on making sure your enterprise architecture delivers real business value. That’s the authoritative conclusion from Len Fehskens, The Open Group’s resident expert about anything having to do with enterprise architecture.  Fehskens’ official title is vice president and global profession lead for The Open Group.  Read More

 

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The postings in this blog are my own and don't necessarily represent BMC's opinion or position.
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- by Tom Parish, Social Media Consultant

 

 

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In 2000 a fire at the Philips chip plant in New Mexico sent shockwaves through the telecom industry. Nokia and Ericsson – the two major telecom companies that used the chips– handled this event very differently.  Nokia had the processes to deal with it immediately and worked with partners to adapt to what happened.  Because Ericsson didn’t have processes in place to deal with this event, it, on the other hand, lost hundreds of millions of dollars immediately. By 2004 Ericsson saw its revenues decline 52 percent from pre-fire levels.  The face of the mobile phone industry had changed forever, all because of a fire that had been contained in ten minutes.  Read More

 

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The postings in this blog are my own and don't necessarily represent BMC's opinion or position.
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- by Tom Parish, Social Media Consultant

 

 

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Within the past five years, CIOs have seen a broad shift from focusing on the technology aspects of IT management to concentrating on the service management aspects, especially emphasis on how these services help businesses succeed.  For example, version 3 of the IT Infrastructure Library or ITIL v3 has a more logical and intuitive structure than ITIL v2. As a result, people can relate better to this new framework in ITIL v3. Each of the five ITIL v3 books centers on a service lifecycle, such as service strategy, design, transition, operation, and continual service improvement.  Because of the lifecycle approach, people can drill down on the portions of the IT issues and problems they're having at a particular time, and get the answers they need.  Read More

 

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The postings in this blog are my own and don't necessarily represent BMC's opinion or position.
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- by Tom Parish, Social Media Consultant

 

 

Play Podcast

 

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In 2004, the $6 billion Corporate Investment Banking division of Wachovia, one of the largest banks in the country, launched a multi-million dollar, end-to-end, service-oriented delivery platform. Working with the CIO, Tony Bishop, the division's senior vice president and chief architect, spearheaded the three-year transformation program, driven by critical business strategies of being able to compete, using technology, against the best in the industry.  Bishop says, "We wanted the ability to leverage and to reuse technology, and to do it at a lower investment cost than our competitors."  Read More

 

Read & Listen to all EnterpriseLeadership.org Articles & Podcasts

 

The postings in this blog are my own and don't necessarily represent BMC's opinion or position.
It's amazing what I.T. was meant to be.