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BMC Podcasts

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Tom Parish

Keep the Skies Friendly

Posted by Tom Parish Sep 7, 2005
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Keep the Skies Friendly: Podcast with Atwell Williams, Director of Enterprise Service Management

 

 

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You may wonder what in the world running an airport has to do with running a fast-paced IT department in today's business environment. And BMC Software’s Atwell Williams is happy to tell you.

The airport simulation is a teaching tool, devised to show the importance of using the ITIL framework in your IT shop, says Williams. The "game" takes a day, and employs role playing as individuals assume different "jobs" in the business of keeping a busy airport operational and planes flying. The goal is to give non-IT personel a taste of what it's like to work in IT, and how utilizing ITIL can help IT be more efficient and effective. It's a demanding game, as working in a busy IT department is demanding.

 

ITIL provides processes through which technological challenges such as change management can be addressed consistently and intelligently. But Business Service Management is arguably a much more powerful tool for leveraging technology along with people and processes to deliver superior value for an IT investment. BSM is the vision of absolutely aligning the services that IT provides with the company’s business goals -- and providing the means to do this. It encompasses and goes far beyond the scope of the current buzzwords like Service Oriented Architecture. And the journey toward achieving BSM starts with four, simple questions:

 

  • Where are you?
  • Where do you want to be?
  • How are you going to get there?
  • How will you know when you've arrived?

 

Interested in finding out more about BSM, ITIL, and how to keep the friendly skies, well, friendly?

Join Tom Parish as he speaks with Atwell Williams, and find out how your business can be put on the road to greater efficiency and success.

Resources

About SAS

SAS CIO Suzanne Gordon: Seeing the Forest and Trees

Bio

Atwell Williams is presently a director of Enterprise Service Management within BMC Software’s Business School. In this role, Mr. Williams is responsible for educating external customers as well as internal BMC staff in the areas of IT Service Management (ITSM) and the IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL). Mr. Williams is a frequent speaker at industry conferences and BMC Customer Forums. He has also published several whitepapers on the subject of ITSM and Continuous IT Service Improvement.

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It's Not Just About Five 9'S: Podcast with Nick Pachnos, Solutions Marketing Manager for the Mainframe

 

 

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From mainframe programmer to data systems manager to independent film producer to entrepreneur, Nick Pachnos seems to have taken the long road to reach his current career in sales and marketing for BMC Software. But along the way, he gathered a lot of experience, a lot of customer feedback, and a lot of passion for the focus of his current activities at BMC: Business Service Management.

 

After all, when a customer says that all nine of his operational entities may report 99.9-percent availability, but his business still experiences system downtime, something is fundamentally wrong here. And that something, according to Pachnos, is that today's IT organizations - as sophisticated and reliable as they are - need to be truly aligned with the business organizations that they support if they are going to provide real value.  Mainframe needs to be tightly integrated with distributed systems, all must be very transparent, and all must be tightly integrated with the company's business units.

 

BMC Software's Business Service Management solution just makes sense, says Pachnos. It provides the capability to take all those alerts going off in the data system and present them in a way that shows the immediate impact to the business. And with its additional Help Desk software and CMDB, customers can think globally about every activity that occurs in IT – including capacity and asset management – and see how they affect the business. The future of well-run, cost-efficient and competitive companies, says Pachnos, is in business operations and IT becoming more seamless, more integrated, less siloed, and more interdependent. "It's not about just having five 9's anymore," he concludes.

 

Bio

 

Nick Pachnos began his IT career in 1983 as a MVS systems programmer. He worked as a data center manager and strategic analyst for large financial institutions, managed the Mainframe Professional Services Practice and was a regional sales manager for BMC Software before beginning his current position. He is proud of Greek heritage and cheerfully admits that the characters and situations depicted in My Big Fat Greek Wedding are about 99 percent true.

Tom Parish

No Data is an Island

Posted by Tom Parish Jun 16, 2005
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No Data is an Island: Podcast with Brian Emerson, Marketing Manager

 

 

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IT seems to be the quintessential land of buzzwords, and now there is a new one: Configuration Management. What is it? Why should you care about it? TalkBMC asked BMC's Brian Emerson whether or not he could help explain this new term. And he did explain it, in terms that would make sense to both the IT operations side and the business side.

Says Emerson, configuration management is a hot term in the marketplace right now. The term arises from ITIL -- the IT Infrastructure Library -- that more and more IT shops are using to establish best practices for their operation and to find consistent ways of running IT processes. According to ITIL, a configuration management database (CMDB) captures not only information about your IT shop's assets (e.g., servers, desktops), but also about the relationships between these assets and the relationships these assets have with your company's business processes. So what if one server experiences downtime? Well, what if that server is related to your company's order taking process -- downtime for that asset hurts!

 

Getting The Big Picture of your IT infrastructure is not easy, given all the various silos of data that accumulate in any business. But that picture becomes a lot clearer using a CMDB, and this improved view can help you make better business decisions, based on what is best for the business, not just for IT.  Today, IT cannot be an island apart from the business it supports.  Viewing IT's assets in their business context adds value to the organization and value to the business.

 

Resources

Service Impact Manager

 

Bio

Brian Emerson is a solutions marketing manager for BMC Software solutions focused on enabling technologies, including the BMC Atrium Configuration Management Database (CMDB). Brian joined BMC in July 2000; previously, he worked as a product manager in the AR System Product Management at BMC Remedy. He has a bachelors degree in Operational Management and Information Systems from Santa Clara University.

Tom Parish

Who Are You

Posted by Tom Parish May 25, 2005
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Who Are You: Podcast with Chris Williams, Identity Management Expert

 

 

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A lot has changed in corporate security since the days of big, centralized mainframes. Today's decentralized systems pose new security issues, with their multiple access points and data storage repositories. Now, employees, vendors, and even customers around the world need access to data, and the corporation needs more safegaurds to manage that access. Add to this the threat of identity theft and hacking; and, then, of course, there's Sarbanes-Oxley and global privacy rules: You have a complex and costly soup of security requirements and privacy issues.

 

Identity Management steamlines compliance with today's corporate and government regulations, ensures the integrity of valuable data, and safegaurds individuals' privacy, efficiently and cost-effectively.

 

In this podcast, Tom Parish and BMC Software's Chris Williams explore the issues and challenges posed by today's corporate identify management.

 

Bio

Chris Williams manages a direct channel enablement team for BMC Software's Identity Management business unit. His primary responsibilities include IdM evangelism, media and analyst relations, competitive and market analysis. He also serves on BMC Software's Thought Leadership Council for Sarbanes-Oxley initiatives. Chris has over 23 years of experience in the IT industry.

Tom Parish

Customer Churn

Posted by Tom Parish May 25, 2005
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If you're in business today, there's a very good chance that you've heard the phrase, "customer churn." And according to a new survey, if you're a service provider and particularly if you're in the insurance, banking, telecommunications, or Internet services business, you've not only heard of "customer churn" but you're experiencing lost revenue and lots of pain because of it. Customer churn is another way to say that if the service you provide your customers is not adequate (or, according to some customer comments from the survey, downright lousy), those customers are going to do business with another provider. And losing existing customers is as painful for your business as acquiring new customers is delightful. The survey on customer churn, commissioned by BMC Software and conducted by Research Now, lays out the landscape of customer churn in Europe (easily extensible to the U.S.): what age group, nationality, and income group is most likely to walk; which service providers are most likely to experience churn; and what are the reasons most commonly cited for customer loss. Bottom line? It's all about looking at service from the customer's point of view rather than from the company's: looking from the outside in.

But, why would a software company commission a survey on consumer behavior? To illustrate how changing some business priorities, and adding the right value elements to your IT department, could vastly improve the customer experience, and save millions in revenue. BMC's Peter Armstrong is on a crusade to drive home this point: with Business Service Management, your IT department can help calm the customer churn, whether by decreasing system problems, increasing service availability, or enabling effective knowledge management. With BSM harnessing the power of IT, your business can truly see what your service looks like, from the customer's point of view, and do what it takes to keep them happy. Tune in to this podcast interview to get more insights about IT and customer service, and download the survey to get all the details.

 

Resources

BMC Churn Index Survey: March 2007

IT WeekPoor IT Systems Contributing to High Customer Churn

BBC Breakfast News

Bio

Peter Armstrong is responsible for the increasingly important domain of how business and information technology need to work together. Armstrong has helped to develop the company’s Business Service Management (BSM) strategy. He is also responsible for educating BMC Software's customers and employees, the media, and analysts about the company's vision and strategy. In addition to evangelizing, he works closely with the company's development labs to keep them informed about customer plans and activities, particularly in the non-U.S. marketplace, helping to ensure that the solutions BMC Software delivers are pertinent worldwide both today and in the future.

Tom Parish

The Power of Simplicity

Posted by Tom Parish May 25, 2005
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The Power of Simplicity: Podcast interview with Scott Sloan, solutions marketing manager for infrastructure and application managment for BMC Software

 

 

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Just as today's enterprise is becoming more complicated than ever -- a mix of multiple platforms, vendor software, open source, mainframe, and distributed systems -- the quest for simplicity is becoming more important. Simplicity can mean the difference between an efficient and agile IT that provides great service, and an IT that is slow, costly, and ineffectual. Simplicity in managing your infrastructure can mean the difference between IT being a business drag or a business driver.

In this podcast interview, Scott Sloan, solutions marketing manager for infrastructure and application management for BMC Software, talks candidly about why it takes not just service level management, but unified service level management to drastically improve service quality and service responsiveness for the business. He also discusses ITIL, and why it is becoming such a cornerstone for global IT, about leveraging virtualization for the enterprise, and how the agent-based versus agentless debate may finally be settled. Join us as we talk with Scott Sloan about how simplicity rules in today's complex global IT environment.

 

Bio

Scott Sloan is a Senior Manager in BMC Software's Solutions Marketing organization focusing on distributed database management and transaction management solutions. While at BMC the past 9+ years, he has held a variety of marketing positions based in the US and Europe. Prior to joining BMC, Scott worked as a systems integrator with Andersen Consulting (now Accenture) where he developed expertise in designing and building client/server applications. He has advanced degrees in business and Latin American studies.

Tom Parish

In the Mind of a CTO

Posted by Tom Parish May 25, 2005
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In the Mind of a CTO: Podcast interview with Tom Bishop, chief technology officer for BMC Software, Inc.

 

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What does business service management (BSM) nirvana look like, and have extraterrestrials ever visited earth? Tom Bishop, chief technology officer for BMC Software, Inc., explores these, and a variety of intriguing topics like data center optimization, service desk, and the data center of tomorrow. But he doesn’t stop there: Bishop also shares thoughts about software as a service; the re-emerging role of management architectures; open source, and social media technologies; and the future of the CMDB. Download this four-part podcast interview.

 

Delving Deeper Into the Mind of a CTO: Part 1 of 4 - BSM Nirvana

 

 

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In this podcast, Tom Bishop shares his vision for BSM nirvana, and describes why the launch of BSM at BMC this year was so important. He also discusses a variety of topics including data center optimization, the service desk, and BMC UserWorld. Tom makes some predictions about the data center of tomorrow and how the current (loose) connections IT has with the business will tighten, and the two will align and integrate. He also shares some thoughts about ITIL, process improvement, and the impact of the fall of Enron (and the inception of Sarbanes-Oxley) on big business.

 

Delving Deeper Into the Mind of a CTO: Part 2 of 4 - Software as a Service and the Re-emerging Role of Management Architectures

 

 

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Is software as a service a great idea that will never really catch on? Tom Bishop thinks it is a critical and important shift that is happening in the marketplace today. Not every application can be best leveraged as a service, but he believes that a major share will be delivered this way in the future. Finally, Tom considers Web services and the re-emerging role of management architectures: Will these become hot tech topics once again?

 

Delving Deeper Into the Mind of a CTO: Part 3 of 4 - Technology Buzzword Bingo

 

 

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A little technology buzzword bingo, anyone? Forget about prep work; Tom Bishop talks candidly about his vision of the future for XML, AJAX, RSS, Linux, social media, and "Web 3.0." Will the Web ultimately function as the operating system? And, oh yes, what about the possibility of life on other planets?

 

Delving Deeper Into the Mind of a CTO: Part 4 of 4 - The Future of the CMDB

 

 

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Yes, there is a lot more to know and envision about the CMDB, and in this interview, Tom Bishop shares his thoughts. What if it comprised solely business information instead of just IT assets? Tom disagrees with this approach and offers a few examples of his theory of relativity around data. The future of BSM, says Tom, is as tied to the success of the CMDB as the future of the definition of the Internet is to the DNS. And the future opportunity for BSM is just ahead of us -- once we get out of the way.

 

Resources

 

Thought Leadership at BMC Software

Bio

 

Tom Bishop was named one of the top 25 CTOs by InfoWorld Magazine in 2004, and is a well-known industry innovator who holds nine patents in fault tolerant computing and in leading the development of industry standards such as the Distributed Management Task Force (DMTF) and POSIX.

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The Hidden Podcasts - Part 1: Podcast with Tom Bishop, Chief Technology Officer at BMC Software, Inc.

 

 

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What does computer dating and BMC Software's Chief Technology Officer have in common? Well, writing code for a computer dating program introduced Tom Bishop to a world of possibilities in programming. At Cornell, he displayed early ambition, deciding on a flexible computer science program that enabled him to study exactly what he wanted. Tom left the Ph.D. program to apply theory in applications to real problems at Bell Labs. His work with voice switches in the telecommunications industry netted him a patent in record time. But he learned hard lessons along the way that still resonate today.

 

Tom gives critical advice about making economic assumptions in design, and when those assumptions can become fatal to your business. Be very deliberate when you build the DNA within an organization, Tom warns. You must be aware on an ongoing basis and ask, "Does this DNA serve us, or harm us?" There are organizational "givens" that sometimes may be harmful, and you will have to identify and discard these as quickly as possible. The industry is constantly evolving ... and this is the only way to stay ahead.

 

Resources

The Hidden Podcasts - Part 2

Thought Leadership at BMC Software

 

Bio

Tom Bishop was named one of the top 25 CTOs by InfoWorld Magazine in 2004, and is a well-known industry innovator who holds nine patents in fault tolerant computing and in leading the development of industry standards such as the Distributed Management Task Force (DMTF) and POSIX.

Tom Parish

ITIL is Music to My Ears

Posted by Tom Parish May 25, 2005
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Live from BMC UserWorld 2006: ITIL is Music to My Ears: Malcolm Fry, Industry Luminary; Peter Armstrong, Corporate Strategist; Ken Turbitt, Best Practices Director

 

 

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Have you ever thought there might be a correlation between implementing ITIL and listening to a great orchestra? TalkBMC caught these three ITIL experts after a session at BMC UserWorld 2006 called "Orchestrating ITIL", where we were guided through the ITIL process in a very musical way. Malcolm discusses what most people forget about ITIL and why, Ken talks about the sessions that are most popular, and Peter offers his opinions while playing the piano.

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BSM, A Deliberate Revolution: Podcast with Peter Armstrong, Corporate Strategist

 

 

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If you can catch Peter Armstrong on the phone, chances are he's just gotten off a plane from Johannesburg or Lucerne, and he's on his way next to Houston or New York. The conversation will be pleasant, fast-paced, and to the point. Peter doesn't like to waste anybody's time -- yours or his.

But when this corporate mover-and-shaker talks about the Business Service Management (BSM), BMC's hot new approach to realizing real value from IT organizations, he uses terms like "deliberate," "step-by-step," and "mapping out the steps" to implementing BSM -- hardly a rapid-fire methodology. But according to Armstrong, this is the only way to get from where you are in IT maturity to where you want to be. And if your IT shop is in what many of us fondly refer to as the "fire fighting mode," moving up the BSM roadmap is the right move to make.

 

BSM is a mindset, not a product set, Armstrong emphasizes. You can't buy BSM out of a box; it's a journey that comprises people, processes, and technology. It requires envisioning how you'd like your IT group to function and to be perceived, getting rid of the silos in your service organization, and engaging your business customers 100 percent in the process of change. In other words, it's a total shift in culture, he adds. But with BSM, in the end, your company will see IT as a revenue generator instead of a cost center, a strategic edge rather than a necessary evil.

 

Says Armstrong, BSM is a strategy that is saving millions for companies today, and that's already adapting to the IT environment of the future. And even though it starts with a vision – your vision – it is achieved the old fashioned way: pragmatically, deliberately, realistically.

 

To hear more about BSM, today and tomorrow, tune in to a lively conversation with one of BMC's brightest visionaries, Peter Armstrong.

 

Bio

Peter Armstrong is responsible for the increasingly important domain of how business and information technology need to work together. Armstrong has helped to develop the company’s Business Service Management (BSM) strategy. He is also responsible for educating BMC Software’s customers and employees, the media, and analysts about the company’s vision and strategy. In addition to evangelizing, he works closely with the company’s development labs to keep them informed about customer plans and activities, particularly in the non-U.S. marketplace, thus helping to ensure that the solutions BMC Software delivers are pertinent worldwide both today and in the future.

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The Hidden Podcasts - Part 2: Podcast with Tom Bishop, Chief Technology Officer at BMC Software, Inc.

 

 

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Tom Bishop, Chief Technology Officer at BMC Software, continues his conversation about Tandem and Tivoli/IBM, people he admires, open source technology, and lessons he has learned in his career ... including how to talk to customers. Another important lesson that has stayed with him is how, and when, to make a decision. When it comes time, you have to take a leadership stand. Make a decision, make it intentionally, and then get on with it, says Tom.

 

Tom was coming of age in an industry in which there were few "pure" software companies, when software was built with something else in mind: to sell more hardware. Today's software industry is very different economically, but is now grappling with open source and its place in the enterprise. This is a huge shift for some, challenging long-held beliefs about keeping source code proprietary rather than freely distributing it to a worldwide development community. However, BMC uses a large amount of open source components in its products. Tom believes that open source is just another link in the chain of software evolution ... and it gives our industry new options for growth and opportunity.

 

Resources

The Hidden Podcast - Part 1

Thought Leadership at BMC Software

 

Bio

Tom Bishop was named one of the top 25 CTOs by InfoWorld Magazine in 2004, and is a well-known industry innovator who holds nine patents in fault tolerant computing and in leading the development of industry standards such as the Distributed Management Task Force (DMTF) and POSIX.

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The Technology That Drives Dashboards: Podcast interview with Tom Bishop, chief technology Officer and Ashish Arora, solutions architect at BMC Software, Inc

 

 

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Today, businesses can enjoy innovative, interactive ways to access information thanks to ongoing technology advances. And, BMC Software makes the most of these advances -- particularly Rich Internet Applications (RIA) -- to redefine the face of its BSM offering. With RIAs, BMC Software can provide nearly real-time information available through visual dashboards. These dashboards are designed not just for IT users, but for business leaders, too. According to Ashish Arora, BMC’s Solutions Architect, “the brand ambassador that speaks directly to the customer is the user interface.”

This podcast features Ashish and BMC Software’s chief technology officer, Tom Bishop, discussing the strategy, design, and technology behind BMC Dashboards for BSM. Tom and Ashish outline the value proposition, compare alternate technologies, and detail the internal review process and stakeholder feedback that produced the dashboard offering. They also share their vision of getting decision-enabling information to the right users at the right time efficiently with techniques like progressive disclosure and explorative animation.  Listen as they share their vision for the future: combining IT and business metrics, finding the “golden mean” between a rich user experience and processing, and delivering information simply, across a multitude of devices.

 

Resources

Thought Leadership at BMC Software


Bios

Tom Bishop was named one of the top 25 CTOs by InfoWorld Magazine in 2004, and is a well-known industry innovator who holds nine patents in fault tolerant computing and in leading the development of industry standards such as the Distributed Management Task Force (DMTF) and POSIX.

 

Ash Arora is a Solutions Architect at BMC. His charter at BMC is to develop innovative, BSM-focused products. Currently, he is spearheading the BSM dashboards, which offer a next-generation experience and access to BSM performance indicators. Before joining BMC, he co-founded Vincera Software, a Business Activity Monitoring (BAM) company. Prior to that business venture, he architected a pivotal large scale, business-critical solution called Display Book for the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE).

Tom Parish

Thinking out of the Cubicle

Posted by Tom Parish May 25, 2005
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Thinking out of the Cubicle: Podcast interview with Peter Armstrong, corporate strategist, BMC Software, Inc.

 

 

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These days, Peter Armstrong spends a lot of his time traveling the globe, talking (and listening) to BMC Software's customers and employees, the media, and analysts about the company's vision and strategy, among other things. But Peter actually began his career as an IMS specialist, helped design parts of DBRC and wrote the Recovery/Restart procedures for IMS disk logging while at IBM. So he knows a little about databases ... spent a lot of time talking to DBAs over the years, and a question he's been asked repeatedly lately is one I'm sure most of us in tech have heard (and asked): "How do I keep my job?"

In this Brave New Tech World of outsourcing and offshoring, we've all either heard that question, asked it ourselves, or thought of it. Author, IMS expert, and corporate strategist Peter Armstrong hears that a lot from IT professionals, including DBAs. And the quick answer he gives to them is, "learn how to talk without talking tech." Peter is a strong proponent of that hot, new craze that is sweeping IT: Coming out of the cubicle and being part of the business. And learning about solid IT best practices is a good way to begin. Agree? Disagree? Tune in and find out --

 

Bio

Peter Armstrong is responsible for the increasingly important domain of how business and information technology need to work together. Armstrong has helped to develop the company's Business Service Management (BSM) strategy. He is also responsible for educating BMC Software's customers and employees, the media, and analysts about the company's vision and strategy. In addition to evangelizing, he works closely with the company's development labs to keep them informed about customer plans and activities, particularly in the non-U.S. marketplace, thus helping to ensure that the solutions BMC Software delivers are pertinent worldwide both today and in the future.

Tom Parish

The Psychology of IT

Posted by Tom Parish May 25, 2005
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The Psychology of IT: Podcast interview with Brent Brightwell, senior solutions marketing manager at BMC Software, Inc.

 

 

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Does the idea of implementing a CMDB seem, well, overwhelming? Brent Brightwell, senior solutions marketing manager at BMC Software, can help. Brent understands that the cure for the common feeling of IT dread is knowing where to start for your enterprise - a comprehensive discovery solution. Yes, you can't manage what you can't see ... but is it all just about discovering IT assets? No, says Brent, now there is technology that allows you to discover people and business processes as well.

In this interview, Brent illustrates his point by mapping business service management (BSM) to Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. In his vision, BSM is self-actualization for your business. But, to achieve this, you must begin with a solid foundation, including knowing what IT, people, and business processes do you have; how are they all connected; and how do they support your business processes? He guides you through understanding what discovery is and what it is not. (A comprehensive discovery solution is not an asset repository or another Excel spreadsheet, he says.) Automated discovery is the key, but requires the correct approach. Brent shows you how to uncover this, and other answers.

 

Resources

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

 

Bio

Brent Brightwell is responsible for BMC Discovery, which is the broadest and most comprehensive discovery solution in the market. He has ten years of experience in the technology industry with leading companies like EMC and Marimba (now BMC). He is a Ph.D. Psychology candidate at Fielding Graduate University, has an MBA from Regis University, and BSB/IS from the University of Phoenix.

Tom Parish

Did You Say Innovation?

Posted by Tom Parish May 25, 2005
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Live from BMC UserWorld 2006: Did You Say Innovation? with Tom Bishop, Chief Technology Officer

 

 

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Tom Bishop can't wait to see Geoffrey Moore, Managing Director of the Chasm Group, talk about Innovation in his keynote on Friday. Live at BMC UserWorld 2006 in San Francisco, he discusses the most profound thing that BSM will do, the sessions he favors, and reveals the secret expectations of a CEO on the CIO.

 

Video: Tom Bishop live from UserWorld


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