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"Not only do I have some technology now that lets me improve what I was doing, I can now do things in ways I never thought possible—it changes  your mindset," says Mike Moser.

 

Doing more with less has been a recurring theme in IT for the past few  years. But Mike Moser, product management director and program executive  within BMC Software’s Mainframe Service Management business unit,  contends that the adage is more accurately stated as "less does more"  when referring to IT. Join us in a discussion with Mike about IT productivity,  based on his recent article published in DbTA Magazine, "IT  Productivity, How Less Can Be More."

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Bio

Mike Moser is a  product management director and program executive  within BMC Software’s  Mainframe Service Management business unit. He  focuses on issues  related to reducing costs while improving IT  efficiency and service  delivery. Mike’s 20-plus year career has spanned  a wide variety of  engineering, IT management, technology consulting  and product management  positions across both technology vendor and IT  end-user organizations.

 

 

 

 

Questions

  1. I'm not so sure I understand the term IT Productivity, service  optimization - sounds a little bit like something management cooked up  to get more out of the group. Talk a little more about what that means.
  2. IT groups are up against significantly increase in complexity. Mainframe  groups are being asked to handle greater workloads, bigger databases,  more applications all while cutting or losing staff.
  3. What are the various activities or things you would focus on now to get  benefit from service optimization?
  4. You mention in your paper this rather interesting relationship between  losing mainframe experts and service automation.
    In the article you talk three-staged approach to service optimization.  Break that down.
  5. How would you go about applying the three-stage  approach that would start producing some results?

 

Resources

DbTA Magazine, "IT Productivity, How Less Can Be More."

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"You really need to  understand what the structure of your service looks like ...  look at it  in terms of what the business looks like," says Vick Vaishnavi.

 

How can IT executives remain  responsive to the varying needs of the  business, in spite of frequent  changes to the IT infrastructure that  impact stability and control? And  how can they accomplish their goals  while still maintaining compliance  with many internal and external  policies and regulations? They can  meet these objectives by implementing  effective change and  configuration management processes and technology.  Join us for Part 2 as we talk with Vick Vaishnavi, vice president of Worldwide  Marketing for BMC Software, Enterprise Service Management, about an  approach outlined a recent  white paper that enables  that enables IT to be highly responsive to the business while maintaining and demonstrating compliance with internal and external policies, standards, and regulations.

Vick Vaishnavi

Bio

Vick Vaishnavi is vice president of Worldwide  Marketing  for BMC  Software,  Enterprise Service Management. He is  responsible  for driving  BMC’s global marketing strategy, market  development,  campaigns, and  field operations  activities.

 

 

Questions

  1. Why is it a good idea to integrate configuration management and  compliance? Aren't the two mutually exclusive?
  2. What are the best  practices for integrating configuration management and compliance  assurance?
  3. What do you mean when you say IT should create a  Holistic IT compliance score?
  4. Finally, where does Business  Service Management fit into this picture?

Resources

White Paper: Reduce  Risk: Three Best Practices  for Integrating Change and Compliance in   the Data Center(pdf)


Part 1 of Best Practices for  Integrating Change and Compliance in the Data Center, with Vick  Vaishnavi

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"The main challenge of compliance is knowing what ... standard you are  going to adhere to," says Vick Vaishnavi

 

How can IT executives remain responsive to the varying needs of the  business, in spite of frequent changes to the IT infrastructure that  impact stability and control? And how can they accomplish their goals  while still maintaining compliance with many internal and external  policies and regulations? They can meet these objectives by implementing  effective change and configuration management processes and technology.  Join us for Part 1 as we talk with Vick Vaishnavi, vice president of Worldwide Marketing for BMC Software, Enterprise Service Management, about an  approach outlined a recent white paper that enables IT to be highly responsive to the business while maintaining and demonstrating compliance with internal and external  policies, standards, and regulations.

Vick Vaishnavi

Bio

Vick Vaishnavi is vice president of Worldwide  Marketing for BMC  Software,  Enterprise Service Management. He is  responsible for driving  BMC’s global marketing strategy, market  development, campaigns, and  field operations  activities.

 

 

 

 

 

Questions

  1. Last time we spoke we talked about CMDB  Implementation, and more recently you've written a white paper  addressing another aspect of the data center, Change and Compliance. Why  is this topic so important? 
  2. Talk a little bit more about  balancing act, how does that look?
  3. What are factors that get in  the way of IT achieving those 2 objectives?
  4. Is this whole  standards concern also a combination of industry standards versus  enterprise standards, and how you sort that out?

 

Resources

White Paper: Reduce Risk: Three Best Practices  for Integrating Change and Compliance in  the Data Center (pdf)

 

Part 2 of Best Practices for Integrating Change and Compliance in the Data Center, with Vick Vaishnavi

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"I would like to hear some of the business  people, the financial teams, the ones that actually have to cost all  this stuff out come back and say 'so how can I use the CMBD and the data  in the CMDB?' " says Gerry Roy.

 

Like the human brain, The configuration management  database (CMDB) gathers and stores information, processes information  into knowledge, and orchestrates action based on that knowledge.  Consequently the CMDB has become, in essence, the very brain of IT  service management and contributes value on its own. Today’s CMDB is  enhanced with several advanced technologies: federation, auto discovery,  dependency mapping, dynamic service modeling, dashboards, predictive  analytics, and process orchestration. These technologies bring several  important capabilities to the CMDB. Now with Software as a Service and  Cloud Computing become more widely used, IT can leverage the CMDB for  these uses as well. Join us as we talk with Gerry Roy, Director of Solutions  Management, for Atrium & IT Business Management at BMC Software,  about how the CMDB has matured, what its role is in current IT  offerings, and the role it can play in helping the business stay  competitive.

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Bio

Gerry  Roy is Director of Solutions Management, for Atrium & IT Business Management at BMC Software. He is responsible for the solutions strategy for the BMC Remedy IT service management suite of applications. He is also responsible for the  strategy of service support and how it interfaces with other disciplines.

 

 

 

Questions

  1. Where did CMBD come from? There's  some debate as to whether it's new or it's been around a long time.
  2. We've been on a continuous path of maturing in the IT infrastructure  world. Without that emphasis the move to more complicated cloud  infrastructures would have been impossible, is that true?
  3. Is a CMDB product that works in a local IT infrastructure environment?  Does that work for cloud infrastructures; does it directly map, or does  something need to be added to it?
  4. Why is federation so important?
  5. How has the CMDB evolved or matured; especially given the new focus on  cloud computing and software as a service?
  6. What are the ways that IT can put the CMDB to work for the business?
  7. What are the top one or two questions you wish people would ask you  about the CMDB, but rarely ask?
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"Understand the service you are delivering today, and what it truly costs before you make an investment in cloud technology," says Steve O'Connor.

 

Like many IT executives, you might be considering cloud computing as a  way to cost effectively deliver IT services to the business. You’re not  alone. IDC predicts that revenue from IT cloud services will grow from  $17.4 billion in 2009 to $44.2 billion in 2013; this is a five-year  annual growth rate of 26 percent, which is more than six times the rate  of traditional IT offerings. The on-demand nature of cloud computing can  result in significant cost savings for an enterprise, because end users  pay for only the services they use and because the IT organization’s  supply and demand model will be more effective. However, the cost could  actually go up unless you do a cost-benefit analysis so that you can  determine what services to move to the cloud. But how do you determine  which IT services or resources can be more cost-effectively delivered  through the cloud? Join us as we talk with Steve O'Connor, general  manager for IT Business Management, at BMC Software, about ways to  determine whether moving applications to the cloud would be  cost-effective for your organization, and some key points about  financial transparency as it relates to cloud computing.

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Bio

 

Steve O’Connor, BMC Software’s general manager for IT  Business Management,is responsible for leading the organization that  develops solutions to provide better transparency into IT resources,  activities, financials, and regulatory compliance.

 

Questions

  1. I'm curious to ask you Steve—does cloud computing always deliver cost savings? Seems that's the mantra these days about the topic.
  2. How do we determine which IT services or resources can be more cost-effectively delivered through the cloud?
  3. What if you're in a complex environment, where most of the resources are shared? How do you take the true cost of a service and charge it to the  person who is getting the value and the benefit from that activity?
  4. What exactly is financial transparency as it relates to cloud  computing?
  5. What kind of approach do you suggest to achieve financial transparency  around cloud computing?
  6. As IT organizations develop cloud computing strategy, what are some  recommendations for achieving success for financial transparency?

 

Resources

 

White Paper—Financial Transparency: The Starting Point For Cloud  Computing (pdf)

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"It's all about building relationships with your customers and using cost information for having intelligent, practical conversations with the customer," says Steve O'Connor.

 

Your business counterparts want to know what IT services they are paying for and how much each service costs. For example, they want to know how much they are paying for smart phones, desktops, and laptops, as well as for the support of these devices. They also want to know the expense of operating and maintaining the sales automation application and any other services that IT is providing. Financial transparency means that you understand the costs IT incurs in providing each specific service to the business and that you can communicate those costs in a language the business understands. Join us as we talk with Steve O'Connor, general  manager for IT Business Management, at BMC Software, about why Financial  transparency matters in IT, and some key tips for simplifying the process of managing and tracking cost of IT services.

Steve-OConnor.jpg

 

Bio

 

Steve O’Connor, BMC Software’s general manager for IT  Business Management,is responsible for leading the organization that  develops solutions to provide better transparency into IT resources,  activities, financials, and regulatory compliance.

 

Questions

  1. What exactly is IT financial transparency?
  2. Is there a shift that's occurred here? Management has always wanted some  kind of transparency, but it seems like now IT is taking greater  responsibility for providing transparency for these kinds of reasons.
  3. Why is financial transparency so important in IT?
  4. What challenges come about from actually trying to provide a transparent  service?
  5. What are some ways to simplify the process of managing and tracking the  cost of services to reach a goal of financial transparency?
  6. Do we have to start from scratch to implement an IT cost management  program?

 

Resources

White Paper: What Exactly Am I Paying For? Why Financial Transparency  Matters In I.T.

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