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Dear Dr. Cloud,

 

BMC did an announcement lately on Service Blueprints. Can you tell me more about them? I'm caught in lingoland these days... Do I use them to draw a service on big sheets of paper and then roll them in a tube and look cool carrying them around town? Do I make copies in triplicate with blue ink? Are these just service offerings?

 

And why aren't there more words in the english language?

 

--Mystified in Majorca

 

Dear Mystified,

 

You're lucky to be in such a warm place! I have often wondered why we dont just make up more words in tech. We keep repurposing older ones, but no one every declares that a Whoosit is an actual piece of hardware. Or the Thingy Layer of the software stack. That would be impressive marketing.

 

Service Blueprints are BMC's way of defining a service delivered through the cloud environment. Think of them as the plans for a cookie-cutter home. There are pieces of that home which are pretty fixed - like a basic floorplan, number of floors, etc. And, when you choose to purchase that home, you can make certain changes. You might be able to grow the house or shrink it to fit your lot size. you might be able to kill a closet and add a Jacuzzi tub. You might be able to pick paint colors, granite and even get wood flooring.

 

Similarly. a Service Blueprint provides the same thing for your cloud users. A well-architected framework of a cloud service, plus a set of configuration levers, from the deployment model to the optional extra RAM or inclusion of Apache. The configurability options are endless - and can be enabled or locked down according to the policies and desires of the cloud administrators.

 

Of course, no end user wants to see this level of sausage being made, so a service blueprint can be recast as an offering in business terminology to the end user.  Make sense?

 

Now, credit where it's due - this question didn't come from Majorca. It came, perhaps, from France, where Mr. TALBOT on the main Cloud Blog... Hi Jaques! I hope this answered your question.

 

Dr. Cloud answers cloudy questions on Tuesdays (or when he's late, Wednesdays). To reach the good doctor, email drcloud@bmc.com